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Is your story really a story?

As a writing coach and author of writing books and articles, I deal in numbers. Volume. Significant databases of writers and stories. Manuscripts, story plans, synopses, samples, story analysis and the hands-on witnessing of stories under development. And I’m here to tell you… … there’s trouble in River City. I see it, I read it, …

Source: storyfix.com

See on Scoop.itWriting your first book

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Author:

Dreams can come true and mine was to live in Spain forever and ever ....  Well, after studying languages many years ago I became totally enamoured with all things Spanish, I finally made the big move for a more 'relaxed' lifestyle in 2003.  Since then, I have been teaching Spanish to Ex-pats and translating. Also, I trained as a Community Manager (Social Media) so that I have a genuine excuse to be on Facebook, Twitter and the Internet for hours on end, but then I started to write. My first attempt was for NaNo 2012 with 'The Nasrid Charm' (a story set in Spain and the Afterlife.) Like most first drafts, this is in need of serious revision and has been placed on the backburner, while I pursue my mystery stories. I'll get back to it - one day :) 

3 thoughts on “Is your story really a story?

  1. I don’t understand everything he’s saying, but I am pretty black and white about whether a book is exceptional or mediocre, sort of “I know it when I see it”. I am often disappointed by today’s best sellers, Oprah picks and New York Times reviews. I have bought too many of their recommendations and been disappointed in the story.

    I wonder if the propensity to focus on “self” with FaceBook, selfies, Instagram , whatever the newest social media buzz has removed us to such an extent from plot immersion that current authors don’t even understand what their books are lacking.

    Would be interested to know your thoughts on his thoughts!

    1. Hi Sammy. I understand where you are coming from. I am currently reading this guy’s book – Story Engineering – which has made me review the elements of my ‘story’ in order to maintain a better structured plot. Some of his tips seemed just like a mish-mash of jargon and at first I couldn’t identify the differences between such terms as ‘concept, premise and theme’. They all merged together and had no clear boundaries. Fortunately for me, the penny dropped and now I hope I have a clearer idea of these terms with regard to my book. I did find all those ‘how to’ suggestions to be slightly demoralising and was more that a little disillusioned with the job of checking this, removing that and rewriting the other. It felt like an endless task and I was not enjoying the editing process one bit. Not one to give up easily, I persevered and this book in particular has given me a clearer sense of structure and plot. Hopefully my story will be stronger as a result and won’t be lacking the core elements of a good book. Like you, I’ve been disappointed by too many books of late. There’s nothing more soul-destroying than having your expectations blown to smithereens by a lacklustre plot twist or an ending that fails to satisfy. I could go on, but I won’t – you’re probably asleep by now anyway! Hope you’re having a great summer and have lots of fun-packed tales to tell.

      1. Thanks for this helpful comment. I’m really flummoxed by his words. I want to study them and your comments, and will likely have more q’s for you 🙂 I really appreciate your “lessons”.

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