Blog Tour ‘n’ Book Review – A House Divided

A House Divided

by Rachel McLean

A House Divided

Jennifer Sinclair is many things: loyal government minister, loving wife and devoted mother.

But when a terror attack threatens her family, her world is turned upside down. When the government she has served targets her Muslim husband and sons, her loyalties are tested. And when her family is about to be torn apart, she must take drastic action to protect them.

A House Divided is a tense and timely thriller about political extremism and divided loyalties, and their impact on one woman.

Grab your copy here.

Seriously, you don’t want to miss it. It’s virtual reality in book form.

So topical.

So tense.

So frighteningly close to the truth.

Amazon UK

Amazon.com

My review: 5/5 stars.

I absolutely devoured this book, it had me gripped from beginning to end.

From the start, Jennifer Sinclair has her hands full with a political career as the Prisons Minister as well as a busy Birmingham constituency to manage, and a family with two school-aged children. She is a politician with a conscience, with principles she believes in and will stand up for – even when it means not following the party line. When she recognises anti-Muslim sentiment growing, she is keen to prevent it from getting out of control.

A fall from grace sees her return to the back benches before returning to a junior role at the Home Office. Unfortunately, a terror attack in London, only increases her workload, and results in a surge of hate crimes against innocent Muslim families like her own. Her husband, Yusuf, knows too well the effects of extremism and while he wants to be supportive of his wife, he is torn between his community and a growing mistrust of the government.

When their eldest son’s name appears on a list of “people of interest” by virtue of connections he has recently made, Jennifer’s world spirals out of control.

Without giving anything away, this story ends by placing Jennifer in a most dangerous position, one which harks back to her earlier role as Prisons Minister.

This is a fast-paced political thriller with a human touch, showing how politics affects our lives in more ways than we ever realise. Set in the near-future, some two years from now, the issues raised here are so topical and increasingly tense, because they reflect many of the sensitive scenarios facing us right now.

This book reveals party politics in all its glory, confirming suspicions that many politicians put career before country. It is all just a touch too familiar, too uncomfortable and too raw. But, by golly, it makes for a fascinating read – if only it weren’t so close to the truth.

I cannot wait for book two – it’ll be a case of ‘drop everything, and do not disturb’ when I get to jump right back into Jennifer’s story.

Well done, Rachel McLean, you’re definitely on my list of ‘books-to-one-click’ from here on.

Author Bio

I’m Rachel McLean and I write thrillers and speculative fiction.

I’m told that the world wants upbeat, cheerful stories – well, I’m sorry but I can’t help. My stories have an uncanny habit of predicting future events (and not the good ones). They’re inspired by my work at the Environment Agency and the Labour Party and explore issues like climate change, Islamophobia, the refugee crisis and sexism in high places. All with a focus on how these impact individual people and families.

You can find out more about my writing, get access to deals and exclusive stories or become part of my advance reader team by joining my book club at rachelmclean.com/bookclub.

Follow Rachel on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram.

Find more reviews, excerpts and author interviews at these amazing blogs.

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