asking questions · Author interview · blog tour · crime · detective · series

Blog Tour Q&A – Injections of Insanity

by Lorraine Mace

Injections of Insanity

Detective Inspector Paolo Sterling has just six weeks to solve a series of murders by insulin injection, with nothing to connect the victims except the manner of death and a note left at each crime scene.

The murderer, determined to avenge a wrong from many years earlier, gets close to his prey by assuming various identities.

Can Paolo win in his race against the pretender?

Purchase Links

UK – https://www.amazon.co.uk/Injections-Insanity-Sterling-Lorraine-Mace/dp/1786156830

UShttps://www.amazon.com/Injections-Insanity-Sterling-Lorraine-Mace/dp/1786156830

Author Bio

When not working on her D.I. Sterling Series, Lorraine Mace is engaged in many writing-related activities. She is a columnist for both Writing Magazine and Writers’ Forum and is head judge for Writers’ Forum monthly fiction competitions. A tutor for Writers Bureau, she also runs her own private critique and author mentoring service. She is co-author, with Maureen Vincent-Northam, of THE WRITER’S ABC CHECKLIST (Accent Press). Other books include children’s novel VLAD THE INHALER – HERO IN THE MAKING, and NOTES FROM THE MARGIN, a compilation of her Writing Magazine humour column.

Social Media Links

Website: www.lorrainemace.com

Blog: http://thewritersabcchecklist.blogspot.com

Twitter: https://twitter.com/lomace

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/lorraine.mace.52

 

Q&A

I’m thrilled to have been able to put a few questions to Lorraine, and even more thrilled to have her answers here too. (Is that fangirling a bit too much? 😉 )

  1. Tell me about your book / series? What do you want readers to most remember after reading it/them?

My D.I. Sterling series is hard-boiled crime. I tend to tackle subject matter that is happening in our society all the time, but which we tend to look away from because knowing it is taking place makes us uncomfortable.

Having said that, what I want readers to remember most is that they enjoyed the read and want to know more about the main characters and their lives.

I knew from the cover that this would be a book I’d enjoy, add into that the topical themes and fascinating characters, it comes as no surprise that readers are hooked and completely invested in this series. 

  1. Does writing energise or exhaust you?

Both! I love being a writer, but the actual writing can be hard work. It is a case of getting the words down on paper and then revising and refining until the text becomes something others would want to read.

I imagine writing a series is even more fraught with issues of consistency and continuity, so the rewards when you get it so right must make it worth the effort.

  1. What’s your favourite genre to read?

I read everything from crime to rom coms, but my favourite genre is American courtroom crime. I have no idea why I am drawn to that, but when it is well written, such as the Dismas Hardy series by John Lescroart, it makes for compelling reading.

I’m a courtroom junkie too. Good to know I’m not alone 😉 

  1. How many unpublished and half-finished books do you have?

After I read this question I stopped writing the answers and went to check! I have four adult novels (nothing to do with this series), three children’s and two non-fiction books started but nowhere near a finished first draft.

That is one heck of a mix! Kudos to you. 

  1. Do you read your book reviews? How do you deal with bad or good ones?

I know I shouldn’t, but I read them all. I have been very lucky so far with this series in that I have only had good reviews. I am sure that will change in time, but for the moment I can read them without losing any sleep.

I would like to think I could ignore a really bad review, but in reality I know it would hurt. Still, that comes with the job, and we authors have to accept that not everyone will love our work.

Wise words. 

  1. Do you hide any secrets in your books that only a few people will find?

Not in my crime novels, but in my children’s novel, Vlad the Inhaler – Hero in the Making, I put in lots of humour for the adults who might be reading with the children, but which would go over the heads of young readers.

Those who read to their kids salute you!

  1. What was your hardest scene to write? Why?

In book two, Children in Chains, I had to write a scene from inside the mind of a paedophile. I sobbed afterwards and felt dirty.

A tough call, but an author’s got to do what an author’s got to do. 

  1. Do you Google yourself? What did you find that pleased you most?

I used to do that, but hadn’t for a long time until I reached this question. I was astounded to find I was still getting links about me on page 11. That surprised and pleased me.

Yay! Happy days!

  1. How long on average does it take you to write a book?

I’m afraid there is no average. I’ve written an 85,000-word novel in three months and taken four years to write a 45,000-word children’s book. I’ve covered most permutations in between for all my finished novels.

  1. If you could speak to any author – past or present – who would you like to meet?

For a crime writer, this one might surprise you, but I would have loved to meet Terry Pratchett and Georgette Heyer. Both writers had the most amazing touch with dialogue that enabled them to include humour that made me genuinely laugh out loud – not the lol kind, but the real thing.

  1. What are you writing now?

I’m just finishing the editing of book five in the D.I. Sterling series (working title Petals of Pain) and am about to start writing book six as yet untitled.

Great news! I’m looking forward to the next one.

So, there you have it … that was fun, right?

For more news and reviews, you could check out these blogs next.

As always,