blog tour · book excerpt · historical · mystery · thriller

Blog Tour – Old Cases, New Colours (including an excerpt)

Old Cases, New Colours

(A Dudley Green Investigation)

Sick of working in a world of spies and bureaucracy, Ena Green, nee Dudley, leaves the Home Office and starts her own investigating agency.

Working for herself she can choose which investigations to take and, more importantly, which to turn down.

While working on two investigations, Ena is called as a prosecution witness in the Old Bailey trial of a cold-blooded killer who she exposed as a spy the year before.

Purchase Links

UK – https://www.amazon.co.uk/Cases-Colours-Dudley-Investigation-Sisters-ebook/dp/B08Y9887QM/

US – https://www.amazon.com/Cases-Colours-Dudley-Investigation-Sisters-ebook/dp/B08Y9887QM/

Author Bio

I was bought up in a pub in a small market town called Lutterworth. For as long as I can remember, my dream was to be an actress and a writer. The pub was a great place for an aspiring actress and writer to live with so many characters to study and accents to learn. I was offered Crossroads the first time around. However, my mother wanted me to have a ‘proper’ job that I could fall back on if I needed to, so I did a hairdressing apprenticeship. Eight years later, aged twenty-four, I gave up a successful salon and wig-hire business in the theatre for a place at East 15 Drama College and a career as an actress, working in Repertory theatre, the West End, film and television.

In 1995, with fewer parts for older actresses, I gave up acting. I taught myself to touch-type, completed a two-year correspondence course with The Writer’s Bureau and began writing articles and presenting radio.

In 2010, after living in London for thirty-six years, I moved back to Lutterworth. I swapped two window boxes and a mortgage for a garden and the freedom to write. Since then, I have written nine novels. The first four, The Dudley Sisters’ Saga, tell the stories of four sisters in World War 2. My current novel, Old Cases, New Colours, is a thriller/detective story set in 1960. I am writing Christmas book – Christmas Applause – and a Memoir; a collection of short stories, articles, poems, photographs and character breakdowns from my days as an actress.

Social Media Links

Madalyn Morgan’s books- https://www.amazon.co.uk/Madalyn-Morgan/e/B00J7VO9I2

Blog – https://madalynmorgan.wordpress.com/

Facebook – www.facebook.com/madalyn.morgan1

Twitter – www.twitter.com/ActScribblerDJ

Pinterest – www.pinterest.co.uk/madalynmorgan

Instagram – www.instagram.co.uk/madalynmorgan1

Excerpt

Intro: Ena is called as a witness for the prosecution in a murder trial at the Old Bailey. When she is cross examined by the defence lawyer of a German spy who murdered her colleague the lawyer twists what she says in an attempt to discredit her.

‘I believe you worked closely with Director Bentley at the Home Office?’

‘Yes.’

‘How many years had you worked with him?’

‘Thirteen.’

‘Thirteen years!’ the defence lawyer exclaimed. He looked at the jury. ‘Thirteen years,’ he said again. ‘And you would have us believe that in all that time you never once suspected he was a spy?’

‘No.’

‘What changed your mind, suddenly?’

‘I had reason to question Richard Bentley’s motives in a certain matter.’

Anderson swung from left to right, his black gown flaring theatrically as he looked around the court. ‘Reason to question? Motives? A certain matter? It all sounds very Machiavellian.’ He put his hand up to his face, his fingers on his lips. ‘And who was it that gave you reason to question the Director of The Home Office?’

Ena had been waiting throughout the cross-examination for a question like this. ‘I am not at liberty to say.’

‘Was it the same person who fed you lies about my client and his lover, Hugh Middleton? The truth is, Mrs Green, Hugh Middleton was not the victim in the relationship. The victim was my client. Mr Middleton cheated on him, lied to him and stole from him. My client regrets the outcome of their relationship and wishes there had been some other way. Alas,’ O’Shaughnessy’s lawyer looked down and sighed, his voice growing deeper and softer as if with emotion, ‘there was no other way.’ The defence lawyer then turned to the jury, cleared his throat, and in a matter-of-fact way, said, ‘During one of Middleton’s aggressive outbursts he attacked my client who, fearing for his life, struck out in self-defence, accidentally killing Mr Middleton.’

Ena looked across at the dock for the first time. She held O’Shaughnessy with a cold stare. As arrogant as ever, he grinned at her. Still looking at O’Shaughnessy, Ena said, ‘Hugh Middleton did not lie, cheat or attack your client. On the contrary–’

‘And how would you know, Mrs Green!’

Ena looked back at the defence lawyer. ‘I am not at liberty to say,’ she said again.

‘Whether you tell the court or not is of no consequence,’ Anderson said, ‘because, Mrs Green, the information that you received came from Nick Miller, a man of dubious character who owned the Minchin Club, a nightclub that my client and his lover frequented in Brighton.’ Anderson looked at the jury, leaned his elbow on the edge of the witness box and crossed his legs as if he was at a bar waiting for a drink. Then, as if something had that second come into his mind, he turned and faced Ena. ‘Perhaps you know Nick Miller better by his real name, Nicolaus Müller – a German spy who became a south London gangster with whom you accompanied to Austria. Is that not so, Mrs Green?’

‘I–’

‘I know!’ Anderson spat, shutting Ena down, ‘You are not at liberty to tell us what information Müller gave you for his freedom.’

‘Before Ena could retaliate, Anderson turned to the judge. ‘No more questions, My Lord.’

Ena looked up at the judge in disbelief. She then looked pleadingly at Sir John.’

The judge waved his left hand. Sir John was already on his feet.

‘If I may, My Lord.’

The Judge nodded.

‘Mrs Green,’ Sir John said with a reassuring smile, ‘would you tell the court why you were not at liberty to answer some of the questions asked you by my learned friend?’

‘I have signed the Official Secrets Act. The work I did at the Home Office was… highly sensitive.’

‘Top Secret?’

‘Yes.’

‘Thank you. You were also asked questions that you were not given time to answer. I apologise in advance if the questions I shall ask you now are repetitious.’ Ena nodded. ‘On the day of McKenzie Robinson’s funeral, did Mrs Robinson accuse you of killing her husband?’

‘No. Mrs Robinson said it was my fault that her husband had been killed, not that I had killed him.’ 

‘Your fault? Why?’

‘Director McKenzie was going to help me with an investigation I was working on before he was murdered. He gave his wife a folder to give to me, which she gave me on the day of his funeral.’ Tears filled Ena’s eyes as Mac’s last words came into her mind. “Make sure Ena Green gets this.”

‘No,’ Ena said, wiping her eyes with the back of her hand, ‘Eve Robinson did not accuse me of killing her husband. ‘Her exact words were, “I hope what you find in there was worth my husband’s life. If you hadn’t come to the hospital to see him, he would still be alive.”’

‘Thank you for clearing that up, Mrs Green.’ With a sympathetic smile, Sir John said, ‘Are you happy to continue?’ Ena nodded. ‘I think the court has been misled about your association with Mr Nick Miller. Would you describe the relationship between yourself and Mr Miller and tell the jury why you travelled with him to Austria?’

‘There was no relationship. Nick Miller had been taken into Police custody for questioning. He had valuable information that the security services – my department in particular – and the Police needed in order to expose a large and deep-rooted spy ring. As you know, the Director of the Home Office was the head of the cell, Helen Crowther and Shaun O’Shaughnessy were members. Nick Miller said he would release the information once he had arrived safely in Austria. I didn’t choose to go with him, he insisted I went as insurance.’

Ena looked at the jury. ‘But I did have a personal reason for accompanying Nick Miller to Austria. Nick had proof that Helen Crowther, who was found dead on December 23rd, 1958 in my office, had killed herself. Crowther went to extraordinary lengths to make her suicide look as if my husband had murdered her. I flew to Austria with Nick Miller to save my husband from being hung for a murder he did not commit.’

‘Thank you, Mrs Green.’ Sir John turned to the judge. ‘No more questions My Lord.’

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Giveaways · historical · WWII

Blog Tour – Clipped Wings

ClippedWingsBT

I am thrilled to share this extraordinary book with all of you today! Please read on for an excerpt from Clipped Wings by Molly Merryman and a chance to win a $25 Amazon gift card!ClippedWings (2)Clipped Wings: The Rise and Fall of the Women Airforce Service Pilots (WASPS) of World War II

Publication Date: September 15, 2020

Genre: History/ WWII/ Aviation/ Female Pilots In her exhilarating book Clipped Wings: The Rise and Fall of the Women Airforce Service Pilots of WWII, author Molly Merryman shines light on the critical and dangerous work of the daring female aviators who changed history. New York University Press classics series has just updated the book with Merryman’s reflections on the changes in women’s aviation in the past twenty years. A documentary based on Merryman’s work, Coming Home: Fight For A Legacy, is currently in production. The WASP directly challenged the assumptions of male supremacy in wartime culture. They flew the fastest fighter planes and heaviest bombers; they test-piloted experimental models and worked in the development of weapons systems. Yet the WASP were the only women’s auxiliary within the armed services of World War II that was not militarized. In Clipped Wings, Merryman draws upon finally-declassified military documents, congressional records, and interviews with the women who served as WASP during World War II to trace the history of the over one thousand pilots who served their country as the first women to fly military planes. She examines the social pressures that culminated in their disbandment in 1944—even though a wartime need for their services still existed—and documents their struggles and eventual success, in 1977, to gain military status and receive veterans’ benefits.

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Excerpt

WASP Missions

Airplane ferrying was the initial mission for which WASPs were created, and it would occupy nearly half of all active WASP graduates when the program ended in December 1944. Planes produced in the United States needed to be flown from the factories to air bases at home, in Canada, and overseas. To handle this transportation demand, the ATC hired thousands of male civilian pilots to ferry planes. These male pilots were later commissioned directly into the AAF if they met the requirement and desired commissioning. The WASPs were brought on as ferrying pilots, and by the time they were disbanded in December 1944, they had delivered 12,652 planes on domestic missions. By that time, 141 WASPs were assigned to the ATC. Although they comprised a small percentage of the total Ferrying Division pilots, WASPs had a significant impact. By 1944, WASPs were ferrying the majority of all pursuit planes and were so integrated into the Ferrying Division that their disbandment caused delays in pursuit deliveries.

The days of ferrying pilots were long and unpredictable. At bases that handled a range of planes, pilots did not know from one day to the next what planes they would be flying or how long of a flight to expect. In Minton’s words, “We usually reported to the flight line at seven o’clock in the morning and looked at the board to see what had been assigned us in the way of an airplane, where it went and what we would need in the way of equipment to take along, and then we would go out to find our airplane and sign it out at operations and check it over to be sure everything was okay with the airplane. And then we would take off to wherever the plane was supposed to go.”

Ferrying military aircraft during World War II was not an easy task. The majority of these planes were not equipped with radios, so pilots navigated by comparing air maps with physical cues (highways, mountains, rivers, etc.) or by flying the beam. (The “beam” was a radio transmission of Morse code signals. A grid of such beams was established across the United States. To follow the beam, a pilot would listen on her headphone for aural “blips” or tones to direct her. This required a great deal of concentration and was not always accurate.) Both navigational techniques were difficult, and this was compounded by the facts that many air bases and factories were camouflaged, blackouts were maintained in coastal areas, and the navigational beams were prone to breaking down. Problems sometimes arose with the planes themselves, which ha d been tested at the factories but never flown. Cross-continental flights often took several days, depending on the planes being flown and weather conditions.

In addition, planes equipped with top secret munitions or accessories had to be guarded while on the ground, and WASPs received orders to protect these planes at all cost. WASPs flying these planes were issued .45 caliber pistols and were trained to fire machine guns.

Available on Amazon

About the Author

Merryman, Molly

Molly Merryman, Ph.D. is the founding director of the Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality and an Associate Professor at Kent State University. She is the Historical Research Producer on the upcoming Red Door Films documentary about the WASP, Coming Home: Fight For A Legacy. She has directed and produced nine documentaries that have been broadcast and screened in the United States and United Kingdom. She is the research director for the Queer Britain national LGBT+ museum and is a visiting professor and advisory board member for the Queer History Centre at Goldsmiths, University of London. Merryman is the vice president of the International Visual Sociology Association. Deborah Brosseau Communications

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blog tour · British · Guest Post · historical · series

Guest Post for “Becoming Alfie” – a new historical fiction series.

Becoming Alfie

Alfie Norrington was born into poverty in London’s East End in the first minute of the twentieth century. His life was a battle. From the Brick Lane markets where young Alfie pilfered and pickpocketed, to the trenches of Flanders, Alfie fought every step of the way.

Almost killed by a trench bomb he battled to recover and while in a military hospital Alfie made a promise that dramatically change’s his life. A true East End hero, Alfie begins his journey away from poverty armed with a robust moral compass and an open heart.

Becoming Alfie is the first in the Alfie Norrington series. It follows the life of a man who positively influenced thousands of people. The world needs more individuals like Alfie Norrington, that give much more than they take.

Purchase Links

www.alfienorrington.com

https://www.amazon.com/Becoming-Alfie-Norrington-Book-One-ebook/dp/B08KD57DFW

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Becoming-Alfie-Norrington-Book-One-ebook/dp/B08KD57DFW

Author Bio – Born in South Essex close to the River Thames and directly East of London, my childhood was peppered with memories of the mighty river itself.

We would swim, fish and discover hidden treasure in the tidal mudflats with the fragments of clay pipes we found taking us back to another era. It was here that my inspiration for writing was born. I began to keep a diary of my observations from life and documented my feelings and thoughts.

My wife was twenty two and I was twenty four when we migrated to Australia with a glorious expectation. The sun was shining, the people were friendly and Sydney Harbour simply magnificent. Together we were committed to making the most of this opportunity beginning the next step in our lives. Everything was new which gave me endless writing opportunities that I recorded in my diary which had spilled over into a number of books. We travelled around this incredible country meeting people from all walks of life and from many nationalities. We lived and worked in a variety of capital cities enjoying each and every experience. All this was tremendous fodder for my writing.

I began to write short stories and poetry, none of which I sought to publish. By my fifty second birthday I was able to finish working and focus full time on my writing, the results so far are The Alfie Norrington Series with Becoming Alfie the first in the series of four. I hope that you enjoy reading Becoming Alfie as much as I did writing it.

Social Media Links

Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/Author-Neil-Patterson-102404418274110

Website. www.alfienorrington.com

Guest Post by Neil Patterson

The freedom to write without constraint is one of the most wonderful aspects of being human. The citizens of the UK along with the majority of people in the world, can write whatever they wish, publish it in some form and discuss the contents locally or globally. It can be shared around the world at the press of a button. These are the two aspects that I would like to dig further into, the freedom of expression and the technology that allows us to hold, share and discuss our musings. Note, this is not about technology, just the concepts thereof.

Many of us have been terribly constrained by the Coronavirus pandemic for the better part of six months, with more to come so it seems. Hand-sanitising, face masks, isolation, devastation for some, loss of income and the rest, you know what I mean. Not one of us has needed to don our safety suits, boots and gloves to sit at our home computer and write. They concerned governments cannot fine me for writing without squirting clean smelling liquid on my hands prior to, or not registering that I am, in fact, about to write. Writing is Covid free, and whilst my trusty old computer may attract the odd virus I am certain it won’t be the virus that sounds like a famous Mexican beer, that has shut down our planet.

So we have complete freedom to write whenever we want to…. but do we have the freedom to write whatever we want to? Some years ago I was extremely lucky to meet with a truly inspirational man called Dennis Waitley and we discussed the concept of freedom in its broader sense. After a few minutes he said to me “Freedom and responsibility go hand in hand. There can be no freedom without responsible action.” He was absolutely correct with that simple statement so let me apply this to the freedom to write. If the writer holds no responsibility for what they write, but just blurt out irresponsible tomes, is this acceptable? Or a leader (think of him as a fictional character, a former reality TV Show host who now is heavily involved in politics, you know him, he has a fabulous comb-over!) that ridicules other world leaders on twitter, is this acceptable? The amount of written violence, as I call it, that pollutes social media, is a perfect example of no consequence writing.

My point on the first part of this blog is that, as writers, if we crave freedom to write, then we must be cogniscent of the implications of our words. The written word, its power, its ability to evoke passion, to make your readers cry and laugh and all emotions in-between, is in your hands. Use it wisely Luke Penwalker!

The second point I raise is more an observation and for any of you who are under thirty and reading this, it will sound almost Victorian. Myself and my beautiful young wife arrived in Australia in February 1981 we had migrated. Sydney was just so far away from London in every aspect. We thought that we may never see our families again, a bit dramatic I know, but that is how isolated we both felt.

Now for the shock; this was pre-internet, pre mobile phone technology, pre desktop computing, pre any communications technology that you can think of, except the telephone. Can you, for just one minute, imagine writing your poems/stories by hand? There were no methods of contacting our families outside of Air Mail (I used to send my Mum an aerogramme each week, google it if you want to know more) and the telephone. Our rented flat didn’t have a phone so we used to book a call to speak with our families every other Sunday night at 8.00pm. We were ushered into a booth at Sydney’s main Post Office in Martin Place moments prior to the call and with one minute of our ten minute call remaining, the operator would come over the line and tell us. On the ten minute mark we would be rudely cut-off, then pay our $20 and miserably head home, some 20 minutes away.

The revolution in technology has changed the above forever. It has given us writers so much more scope, a greater audience, tools to help us find our audience and so much more. What a great time to be alive. You have the skill, you have the desire, you have the technology. Use it wisely Luke Penwalker

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book review · historical · historical fiction · trilogy · Tudor

Book Review – Nest of Ashes

October 1537

At a time of most supreme triumph, the moment of her greatest glory, security and power, a Queen of England lies dying.

Through dreams of fever and fantasy, Jane Seymour, third and most beloved wife of King Henry VIII remembers her childhood, the path forged to the Tudor Court; a path forged in flame and ashes. Through the fug of memory, Jane sees herself, a quiet, overlooked girl, who to others seemed pale of face and character, who discovered a terrible secret that one day would rain destruction upon her family.

Nest of Ashes is Book One in The Phoenix Trilogy: Story of Jane Seymour, by G. Lawrence.

The author’s thanks are due to Julia Gibbs, proof reader of this work of fiction, and to Larch Gallagher, the cover artist.

My Review

I’ve always loved historical fiction and have two favourite periods that never fail to catch my attention. The first is WWII and the other is The Tudors. As author Gemma Lawrence states, there is so little told about Jane Seymour, the third wife of Henry VIII. It’s a huge understatement to say I was intrigued as to how she would portray a story based on someone about whom so little actual “history” is known. Indeed, following Anne Boleyn as Henry’s queen must surely have been a daunting time for Jane, after all was not Anne the original viper in the nest that led to the break with Rome and to Henry’s marriage with the dignified and most-popular Katherine of Aragon.

Nest of Ashes is the first in a trilogy of Jane Seymour’s life, and it is probably in book one where the author has the most scope to create Jane’s story. The author’s has imagined situations from Jane’s early years that are in keeping with the world she inhabits, its traditions and customs. So believable is her creation that you could be forgiven for thinking it is not historic fact, and so engaging is the story that you are instantly drawn into its fictional realm. The very best of both worlds.

When we meet Jane, she is the only daughter (so far) born to the Seymour couple. Her plain appearance marks her out as a disappointment to her mother who had longed for a daughter to grace the King’s Court as she had once done herself. As such, Jane becomes almost invisible to them, particularly when her brother Thomas is around. For Thomas can do no wrong, and despite Jane’s objections to the contrary, it is always she who is on the receiving end of any punishment. Knowing what we do about Jane’s future, it felt as though Karma was watching over her: the invisible daughter who would be queen.

Jane’s world is shaken for the first time when her beloved brother Edward takes a wife, Catherine. This beautiful and vivacious young woman is everything Jane’s mother had hoped for in a daughter, and the Seymour household is soon captivated by her charms. For Jane, that charm quickly wears off when she realises Catherine is not the sweet young woman she professes to be, but rather is intent on seducing Jane’s (and her husband, Edward’s) father. From here on, all doubt as to Catherine’s true nature is cast aside, and Jane sees her only as making a cuckold of her brother. Being invisible to everyone else in the household, Jane has no-one to tell, let alone anyone who might believe her. Confronting Catherine only makes things worse for her.

Jane can only hope her brother will find a place for her at Court, away from her family and the lies she has to ignore daily. When Edward does come through for her, and Jane is called serve Mary, the King’s sister, only then does her mother recognise how much she relied on Jane.

Jane arrives at Court, quiet and reserved and not at all confident of her position. It is her shy nature that catches the eye of Queen Katherine, who takes a liking to the young woman and appoints Jane to her own staff.

Jane’s mother is torn between fury and pride; Jane has usurped her own position at Court and without all the fuss and fancy. She begs Jane to meet with her cousin, Anne Boleyn, which she reluctantly agrees to; they are never going to be close but who would have thought they would be rivals for the King’s affections?

Jane’s future at Court is about to change her life and the history books. Forever.

As Nest of Ashes came to an end, my appetite for the next book only increased. In today’s society we are used to binge-watching complete series, so biding my time until the next instalment will be a challenge. Suffice it to say, I’m ready when you are, Gemma Lawrence! (No pressure LOL)

I received a copy of this book as part of the review-a-book challenge. What a wise move that was on my part.

As always,

blog tour · book review · dark · historical · Italy

Blog Tour ‘n’ Book Review – The Forger and the Thief

The Forger and the Thief

FIVE STRANGERS IN FLORENCE, EACH WITH A DANGEROUS SECRET. AND AN APOCALYPTIC FLOOD THREATENING TO REVEAL EVERYTHING.

wife on the run, a student searching for stolen art, a cleaner who has lined more than his pockets, a policeman whose career is almost over, and a guest who should never have received a wedding invite. Five strangers, entangled in the forger’s wicked web, amidst Florence’s devastating flood of November 1966.

In a race against time, and desperate to save themselves and all they hold dear, will their secrets prove more treacherous than the ominous floodwaters swallowing the historic city?

Dive into a world of lies and deceit, where nothing is as it seems on the surface…

Purchase Link – https://www.books2read.com/forgerandthief

Author Bio:

A full time author, Kirsten is a former customs officer and antiques dealer, and who has also dabbled in film and television.

Her historical time-slip series – The Old Curiosity Shop Series, has been described as ‘Time Travellers Wife meets Far Pavilions’, and ‘Antiques Roadshow gone viral’.

Kirsten released her bestselling gothic horror novel Painted in 2017, with her medical thriller – Doctor Perry, following in 2018.

Her latest thriller – The Forger and the Thief, is set in 1966 Florence, Italy, amidst the devastating floods. Kirsten lives in New Zealand with her husband, her daughters, two rescue cats.

Social Media Links:

Website www.kirstenmckenzie.com
Twitter www.twitter.com/kiwimrsmac
Facebook www.facebook.om/KirstenMcKenzieAuthor
LinkedIn www.linkedin.com/in/kirstenmckenzieauthor/
Amazon www.amazon.com/Kirsten-McKenzie/e/B01F0R5TPS 

BookBub www.bookbub.com/authors/kirsten-mckenzie 

Pinterest www.pinterest.nz/kiwimrsmac/
Instagram www.instagram.com/kiwimrsmac/
Goodreads www.goodreads.com/KirstenMcKenzieAuthor

My Review

With the flooding of the Arno River as the backdrop for this story, the author takes us back to 1966 and the chaos and devastation that hit Florence. It’s November, the time of years when rain is not unusual in the city. The river has a history of flooding going back centuries, and it is a much-feared prospect for its inhabitants. In this case, we have a cast of five strangers telling their stories as the river once more seeks to show its strength. I must add here that the river is a powerful character in its own right with an almighty, almost haunting voice and formidable presence. The author does such a great job in bringing the Arno to life, its whole identity is beautifully explored and highly impactful.

So, back to the people of the story. These are so diverse – or so it would seem – yet their stories are forced to overlap as the river rages. From the student looking for a stolen painting and using her art classes as a cover, to the man about to attend his ex’s wedding having flown in from the US filled with doubt. There’s a woman fleeing an abusive husband, and a cleaner who seems to be caring for his grieving wife while side-lining pieces of art from the museum where he works. And, finally, there’s the policeman who’s ready to retire, worn down by life and now chasing pickpockets and hotel thieves.

Each of them has their plans throw into disarray when the river storms through the streets hell-bent on destruction. The stories race along at a similar pace, fast and furious as the river takes control. Devastation is certain and not everyone will survive.

The Forger and the Thief is an exciting, dramatic story with a dark plot that takes as many twists and turns as the thundering river. Hold on tight, for it’s a bumpy, crazy ride that will leave you begging for more. This is history fictionalised at its best.

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99p books · book blitz · historical · Regency Romance · romance · Uncategorized

Release Blitz – Tempting the Scoundrel

House of Devon, Book 3

 

Historical Romance, Regency Romance

Release Date: September 23, 2020

 

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Only $.99

September 23-27

 

Below stairs is where the romance begins..

As the most distinguished watchmaker in England, Christian Bainbridge believes in accurate timepieces, not love. He secretly offered his heart years ago, and he’s never gotten it back. When Raine Mowbray stumbles into his life again, Christian realizes the woman he’s worshiped from afar is still the woman he desires above all others.

Raine Mowbray needs solitude and employment, not love. A housemaid forced to flee a loathsome earl’s grasp, the last thing she’s seeking is a man’s amorous attention. When she finds herself unexpectantly paired with a gorgeous watchmaker in need of an assistant, she’s unnerved by his wit, kindness—and clandestine devotion to her.

If you like spirited heroines who fight falling in love and charmingly arrogant heroes who think they know best, then this is the book for you! Snuggle up with Tempting the Scoundrel, a steamy second chance, love-at-first-sight Regency Romance!

 

This is a Downton Abbey-ish novella at 98 pages and 25K words!!

 

Find the entire House of Devon Series on Amazon

 

 

 

About the Author

 

Award-winning author Tracy Sumner’s storytelling career began when she picked up a historical romance on a college beach trip, and she fondly blames LaVyrle Spencer for her obsession with the genre. She’s a recipient of the National Reader’s Choice, and her novels have been translated into Dutch, German, Portuguese and Spanish. She lived in New York, Paris and Taipei before finding her way back to the Lowcountry of South Carolina.

When not writing sizzling love stories about feisty heroines and their temperamental-but-entirely-lovable heroes, Tracy enjoys reading, snowboarding, college football (Go Tigers!), yoga, and travel. She loves to hear from romance readers!

 

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Contact Links

Website

Twitter

Facebook

Instagram

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Promo Link

 

 

Purchase Link

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Only $.99

September 23-27

 

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book blitz · Giveaways · historical · historical fiction · RABT Book Tours · social history

Release Blitz – Once in a Blood Moon (with giveaway)

Southern Historical

 

Date Published: June 11, 2020
Publisher: Acorn Publishing

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Heaven Hill Plantation, upriver from Georgetown, South Carolina, 1807: Sixteen-year-old Alexandra Degambia is the daughter of a wealthy African American planter and a social-climbing mother who can pass for white. Balancing on the tightrope between girlhood and the complicated adult world of Low-Country society is a treacherous undertaking.
Early Reviews
Alexandra is a tenacious heroine who’s easy to root for, and the author elegantly articulates her precarious position between white and black society. Overall, this novel explores issues of equality and personal freedom in thought-provoking ways.
 
Sharp writing, an original plot, and a strong female protagonist make for an engrossing read.
-Kirkus Review
This tale of desperation, injustice and courage is a much needed addition to our grasp of our nation’s history. A 5-star reading experience. Highly recommend!”
Laura Taylor – 6-Time Romantic Times Award Winner
About the Author
Dorothea Hubble Bonneau is an award-winning novelist, produced playwright and optioned screenwriter. Inspired by a quest for justice, her work is informed by her love of family, nature, and the literary arts.
Dorothea is a member of Author’s Guild, Women in Film, Squaw Valley Community of Writers, Aspen Summer Words Alumni, and Historical Writers of America.
Contact Links
Twitter: @DorotheaBonneau


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book review · coming of age · Featured Author - Amy Reade · historical · mystery · romance

Book Review – Cape Menace

Cape Menace

by Amy M. Reade

The blurb:

The year is 1714. Two years have passed since Ruth Hanover vanished into the wilderness of the New Jersey colony without a trace, leaving behind her husband, William, and their daughter, Sarah. Though William and Sarah have never stopped hoping that Ruth will return, as time goes by it becomes less and less likely they will ever see her again.

Now William is acting strangely. He won’t tell Sarah why he’s conducting business with a mysterious stranger in the middle of the night, he won’t explain the sudden increase in his income, and he won’t share with her what people in town are
saying about her mother’s disappearance.

When the time comes for Sarah to face her father’s secrets and figure out why her mother never came home that December day in 1712, what she learns will shock her tiny community on the New Jersey cape and leave her fighting for her life.

Get your copy here

About The Author:

Amy is a USA Today and Wall Street Journal bestselling author of Gothic, traditional, contemporary, and cozy mysteries. A former attorney, who lives in New Jersey with her husband, three kids, a dog named Orly, and two cats. When not writing, you will find her in the kitchen or the laundry room, though she much prefers the kitchen. She loves to cook and share the things she makes.

Social Media links:

Newsletter https://www.amymreade.com/newsletter

Website: https://www.amymreade.com

Blog: https://amreade.wordpress.com

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/amreadeauthor

Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/readeandwrite

Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/amreade

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/amymreade

My Review:

Cape Menace is the first in a series of historical mysteries set in Cape May, and before the story starts the author explains how Cape May got its name and of its links with pirates. From that point on, I was hooked. 

It’s 1714 and two years have passed since Sarah’s mother, Ruth, disappeared. Then, the whole community was out looking for her, but to no avail, and her disappearance was deemed permanent, probably as a result of a wolf attack. Now, Sarah and her father, the apothecary, have adjusted to life without Ruth, but the mystery of her disappearance is still uppermost in their minds. The lack of visible clues, clothing, shoes, or even limbs, makes Sarah doubt the wolf attack hypothesis.

Sarah continues in her mother’s footsteps, helping her father in house and with his apothecary business, as well as teaching her best friend, Patience, to read. She is curious about a late night visitor, but her father is a closed book, and refuses to discuss the details with her. It is only when her father falls ill and eventually dies that Sarah has to face head-on those very details. Added to that, he pleads with her to find out what happened to her mother too. 

Now, orphaned and ever more determined, Sarah sets out to learn the truth about her mother’s disappearance while also taking on her father’s business. She proves to be a worthy successor, and her help is sought by many in the community. Here, the author excels in bringing the story to life with pertinent details as to how illness and injury were handled in those times. From the use of herbs to the letting of blood, from midwifery to slathering honey on the wounds of a drunken lout, Sarah rises to every challenge. 

Other historical delights are woven into the story to depict the beliefs and traditions of the period, including the rituals of propriety, unrequited marriage proposals, pirates in the bay, and more … 

Cape Menace proved to be a gently-paced story that held my interest. I enjoyed seeing Sarah grow into the young woman her mother would have wanted her to be, into the adept apothecary of whom her father would be so proud. The pace intensified with moments of high intrigue and fear of what might happen to Sarah, as it then slowed so we could appreciate her thoughts and wonderment for the future. The revelation of the fate which befell her mother was deftly delivered, a sublime and unexpected twist. 

Overall, this story crosses many genres – it is a coming-of-age story with romantic undertones, layered up with mystery and suspense, and sprinkled with beautiful historical elements. Here’s to the next in the series … 😉 

As always, 

 

 

blog tour · book review · dual timeline · France · historical · NetGalley

Blog Tour ‘n’ Book Review – The Secret of the Château

The Secret of the Château

Everything is about to change…

1789. Pierre and Catherine Aubert, the Comte and Comtesse de Verais, have fled the palace of Versailles for their château, deep in the French Alps. But as revolution spreads through the country, even hidden away the Auberts will not be safe forever. Soon they must make a terrible decision in order to protect themselves, and their children, from harm.

Present day. When Lu’s mother dies leaving her heartbroken, the chance to move to a château in the south of France with her husband and best friends seems an opportunity for a new beginning. But Lu can’t resist digging into their new home’s history, and when she stumbles across the unexplained disappearance of Catherine Aubert, the château begins to reveal its secrets – and a mystery unsolved for centuries is uncovered…

Purchase Links

UK – https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B083PNG675

US – https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B083PNG675

Author Bio –

Kathleen McGurl lives in Bournemouth with her husband. She has two sons who have both now left home.

She always wanted to write, and for many years was waiting until she had the time. Eventually she came to the bitter realisation that no one would pay her for a year off work to write a book, so she sat down and started to write one anyway.

Since then she has published several novels with HQ and self-published another. She has also sold dozens of short stories to women’s magazines, and written three How To books for writers. After a long career in the IT industry she became a full time writer in 2019. When she’s not writing, she’s often out running, slowly.

Social Media Links –

Website: https://kathleenmcgurl.com/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/KathleenMcGurl/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/KathMcGurl

My Review

As a fan of historical fiction and Kathleen McGurl, I had super high hopes, and was not disappointed. I loved the dual timeline, especially The French Revolution aspect. Combining the story of the family Aubert with the adventure of the British retirees made for a fascinating read, connecting the past and the present through the château in the Alpes-Maritime and the village it overlooked.

The story of the Pierre and Catherine Aubert, the Comte and Comtesse de Verais begins at the Palace of Versailles, as members of the Court of Louis XVI and Marie Antoniette. As the Revolution takes a hold, Pierre and Catherine flee to his family castle and live a relatively quiet life, raising children, and supporting their tenants and the villagers alike. When revolutionary forces move out of Paris in search of Louis’s supporters, the family is placed in danger again. Someone has betrayed them, and they must flee to safety once more.

If only it were so simple. Baying crowds descend upon the château before they are ready to leave. Will they make it to safety? What becomes of the castle?

In alternating chapters (between the events of the 1780s), the author tells the tale of five Brits looking to start a new life together as retirement beckons. During a boozy evening together, the idea is raised about clubbing together to buy a place in France. Was it an alcohol-fueled pipedream, or could it become a reality? One member of the group, Lu, is less enthusiastic than the others but does not want to be the one to shatter everyone’s dreams. And so, the château is purchased. With its many rooms, outlying buildings and towers, there’s a lot of work to be done, but they get stuck in and start renovating. It’s not until Lu’s son Tom comes for a visit that the window without a room is spotted. Lu’s intrigue is piqued. While her husband tends to the garden with his new pet goat, she starts to research the castle. As they settle into their new life, the secrets of the château are gradually revealed.

The opulence of the French Court and the exceptionalism of the nobility is set against the poverty and anger of the working classes. In the modern setting, the village is harmonious and beautifully depicted. The story explodes at great pace, keeping the history alive as the modern-day residents delve further into what might have happened to the castle’s original owners.

If you love a touch of history with your mystery, then this is the book for you. The pages fly by as each chapter reveals a new layer to the characters and their stories.

Another winner for me from Kathleen McGurl.
Thanks to NetGalley, Rachel’s Random Resources and HarperCollins for a review copy which I have reviewed willingly and honestly.

 

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Audiobook · blog tour · book review · historical · mystery

Audiobook Blog Tour ‘n’ Review – The Girl from Whitfield Hall

Audiobook Blog Tour: The Girl from Whitfield Hall by Pete Harrison

Author: Pete Harrison

Narrator: Christine Rendel

Length: 5 hours 14 minutes

Publisher: Pete Harrison

Released: Nov. 14, 2019

Genre: Mystery

Continue reading “Audiobook Blog Tour ‘n’ Review – The Girl from Whitfield Hall”